Linux Alpine






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Table of Contents

ArcoLinux 18.9.5

ArcoLinux (formerly ArchMerge) aims to help users improve their Linux skills through a four-phase plan.

Phase 1 – ArcoLinux

ArcoLinux contains three desktops: XFCE, Openbox, and i3.

If you start learning linux then XFCE is a great way to start. If you know your way around the system then we can start learning Openbox. You will see it again as a challenge to know how this desktop environment works.  The ultimate challenge then will be to learn to work with a window tiling manager like i3, which is mostly keyboard driven. Each desktop environment increases in complexity.

Phase 2 – ArcoLinuxD

ArcoLinuxD is a stripped down ArcoLinux. No applications (firefox, vlc, …) No desktop environments.

After phase 1 you know what desktop you like and you install the building blocks yourself together with our Youtube tutorials.
We will install Xfce or Openbox or i3 together.

Phase 3 – ArcoLinuxD

ArcoLinuxD is a stripped down ArcoLinux. No applications (firefox, vlc, …) No desktop environments.

There are other desktop environments you can explore. Let us install them together.

Phase 4 – Install Arch Linux

Install Arch Linux the “Arch Way”. Build from Scratch.

Let us install Arch Linux together.
Let us install it the Arch way.
Choose the building blocks.
Choose the desktop environment.
Choose the applications.

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ArcoLinuxD 18.9.5

ArcoLinux (formerly ArchMerge) aims to help users improve their Linux skills through a four-phase plan.

Phase 1 – ArcoLinux

ArcoLinux contains three desktops: XFCE, Openbox, and i3.

If you start learning linux then XFCE is a great way to start. If you know your way around the system then we can start learning Openbox. You will see it again as a challenge to know how this desktop environment works.  The ultimate challenge then will be to learn to work with a window tiling manager like i3, which is mostly keyboard driven. Each desktop environment increases in complexity.

Phase 2 – ArcoLinuxD

ArcoLinuxD is a stripped down ArcoLinux. No applications (firefox, vlc, …) No desktop environments.

After phase 1 you know what desktop you like and you install the building blocks yourself together with our Youtube tutorials.
We will install Xfce or Openbox or i3 together.

Phase 3 – ArcoLinuxD

ArcoLinuxD is a stripped down ArcoLinux. No applications (firefox, vlc, …) No desktop environments.

There are other desktop environments you can explore. Let us install them together.

Phase 4 – Install Arch Linux

Install Arch Linux the “Arch Way”. Build from Scratch.

Let us install Arch Linux together.
Let us install it the Arch way.
Choose the building blocks.
Choose the desktop environment.
Choose the applications.

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GParted Live 0.32.0-1

GParted is the Gnome Partition Editor application. It is an industrial-strength package for creating, destroying, resizing, checking and copying partitions, and the file systems on them. This is useful for creating space for new operating systems, reorganizing disk usage, copying data residing on hard disks and mirroring one partition with another (disk imaging).

GParted enables you to easily manage your disk partitions:

  • Create partition tables, (e.g., msdos or gpt)
  • Create, move, copy, resize, check, label, set new UUID, and delete partitions
  • Enable and disable partition flags, (e.g., boot or hidden)
  • Align partitions to mebibyte (MiB) or traditional cylinder boundaries
  • Attempt data rescue from lost partitions

GParted works with the following storage devices:

  • Hard disk drives (e.g., SATA, IDE, and SCSI)
  • Flash memory devices, such as USB memory sticks and Solid State Drives (SSD’s)
  • RAID Devices (hardware RAID, motherboard BIOS RAID, and Linux software RAID)
  • All sector sizes (e.g., devices with 512, 1024, 2048, 4096 byte sectors and more)
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SparkyLinux 5.5 LXQt

SparkyLinux is a GNU/Linux distribution created on the “testing” branch of Debian. It features customized lightweight desktops, multimedia plugins, selected sets of apps and own custom tools to ease different tasks.

SparkyLinux is a Debian-based Linux distribution which provides ready to use, out of the box operating system with a set of slightly customized lightweight desktops.

Sparky is targeted to all the computer’s users who want replace existing, proprietary driven OS to an open-sourced.

Main features of Sparky
– Debian testing based
– rolling release
– lightweight, fast & simple
– set of desktops to choose: LXQt, MATE, Xfce
– most wireless and mobile network cards supported
– set of selected applications, multimedia codecs and plugins
– own repository with a large set of additional applications
– easy hard drive installation

In general, Sparky is not targeted to Linux beginners, rather to users with some amount of Linux knowledge. Anyway, the Linux beginners are welcome too – our forums is open for any question.

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SystemRescueCD 5.3.1

SystemRescueCD is a Linux system on a bootable CD-ROM for repairing your system and recovering your data after a crash. It aims to provide an easy way to carry out admin tasks on your computer, such as creating and editing the partitions of the hard disk. It contains a lot of system utilities (parted, partimage, fstools, …) and basic tools (editors, midnight commander, network tools). It is very easy to use: just boot the CDROM. The kernel supports most of the important file systems (ext2/ext3, reiserfs, reiser4, xfs, jfs, vfat, ntfs, iso9660), as well as network filesystems (samba and nfs).

Here are some of the main system tools:

  • GNU Parted is the best tool for editing your disk partitions under linux
  • GParted is a Partition Magic clone for Linux
  • Partimage is a Ghost/Drive-image clone for Linux
  • Reinstall the most common bootloaders used with Linux
  • File systems tools (e2fsprogs, reiserfsprogs, reiser4progs, xfsprogs, jfsutils, ntfsprogs, dosfstools) allow you to format, resize, debug an existing partition of your hard disk
  • Sfdisk allows you to backup and restore your partition table
  • Test-disk tool recovers lost partitions and/or makes non-booting disks bootable again; supports reiserfs, ntfs, fat32, ext2/3 and many others
  • Rsnapshot is a filesystem snapshot utility for making backups of local and remote systems
  • EVMS (Enterprise Volume Management System) is a powerful logical volume manager
  • Ntfs-3g for mounting NTFS partitions under Linux with full Read and Write support
  • Floppy disk images (FreeDos, MemTest+, Gag, Ranish Partition Manager, Aida)
  • Applications that provide other important services such as archiving, file editing, CD/DVD burning, anti-virus scanning, web browsing, and secure deletion
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Alpine Linux 3.8.1

Alpine Linux is a community developed an operating system designed for x86 routers, firewalls, VPNs, VoIP boxes and servers. It was designed with security in mind; it has proactive security features like PaX and SSP that prevent security holes in the software to be exploited. The C library used is uClibc and the base tools are all in BusyBox. Those are normally found in embedded systems and are smaller than the tools found in GNU/Linux systems.

Why Should I Try It?
We’re partial, of course, but here are a few reasons:

  • It’s quick: You can boot it from a USB stick and have a very usable system in less than 10 minutes.
  • It’s simple: The package management and inits system is a breeze to use.
  • It has the Alpine Configuration Framework (ACF): While optional, ACF is a powerful web application used for configuring an Alpine Linux device.
  • It’s great for experimenting: Since the system configuration can be backed up to a single file, you will be able to test new configurations before installing them on a production system.
  • It supports Linux VServer: You can run virtualized hosts on it, similar to FreeBSD Jails. (You can even run them on RAM-based installs, and although it’s not very practical, it is worth geek points!)
  • It’s more secure: When The Linux 0-day vmsplice vulnerability was causing admins everywhere to upgrade their kernels post-haste, Alpine Linux systems were basically impervious. Yes, the code crashed the application, but the PaX protection prevented system compromise. The value of PaX and SSP has been proven on more than one occasion.

What’s It Like?
It started out Gentoo-style but is now self-hosting. The network configuration is similar to Debian. If you’ve ever used a BusyBox-based system before, it’s pretty good. The Alpine developers have contributed a number of enhancements to BusyBox, in an effort to make the system run like any other.

As it is a BusyBox-based system, there are no manpages by default; BusyBox applets do not have all of the features of their real counterparts. So, you will run into situations where things don’t run as they do on a “real” Linux system. When you run into those situations, just remember these two things:

  • The base installation is small enough for a firewall/router; there’s nothing there except the basics. You can probably get what you need out of it using the tools that are there, although crudely. (sh / awk/sed / grep can do everything Perl can do… Really.)
  • Alpine has a complete set of packages, but you will need to explicitly choose what you wish to install.

What Should I Know? 
In addition to basic UNIX management, you should know that…

  • Alpine Linux uses apk-tools for its package management system. You will need to learn about apk before you can effectively manage the system.
  • Alpine Linux uses OpenRC for its init system. You will need to know how to add services to the OpenRC startup process.
  • Alpine Linux uses the Alpine Local Backup Utility (lbu), primarily on RAM-based installs; you use it so you don’t lose everything between reboots, but it can also be used to copy a new, tested and working configuration to a production system. You should know that lbu will only backup things in /etc by default.

You should also know that we are engineers, not documenters. There’s not a lot of documentation out there (yet). We are working on it, but could use the help. So in many cases, things are not documented as well as they should be.

How did Alpine Linux Begin? 
Alpine Linux began life as a fork of the LEAF Project. The active members of the LEAF Project wanted to continue making a Linux distribution that ran off of a single floppy disk and we think that’s great; however, our needs required Squid, DansGuardian, Samba, and a slew of other heavyweight applications. So, we ended up with a set of packages that fit onto a CD-ROM.

Why the Name Alpine? 
Alpine originally stood for A Linux Powered Integrated Network Engine. The idea was that the distro would be focused on networking, and be a tiny “engine” or framework upon which larger systems could be built. Today, Alpine lives up to that name. The first open source implementation of Cisco’s DMVPN, called OpenNHRP, was written for Alpine Linux. Improvements to networking functions in the Linux Kernel have started from patches and the needs of the Alpine Linux team.

In addition to its use as a firewall/router, Alpine Linux is also used in a number of installations as the basis for enterprise servers, running software such as PostgreSQL, Postfix, Asterisk, Kamailio, and being used for iSCSI SANs. It is the little engine that could.

Nowadays, Alpine is just a name.

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Parrot Security OS 4.2.2 Home

Parrot Home is a special edition of Parrot designed for daily use, and it targets regular users who need a lightweight, always updated and beautiful system on their laptops or workstations.

The distribution has the same look and feel of a regular Parrot environment and includes all the basic programs for daily work. Parrot Home also includes programs to chat privately with people, encrypt documents with the highest cryptographic standards or surf the net in a completely anonymous and secure way.

The system can also be used as a starting point to build a very customized pen-testing platform with only the tools you need, or you can use it to build your professional workstation by taking advantage of all the latest and most powerful technologies of Debian without hassle.

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Parrot Security OS 4.2.2 Security

Security GNU/Linux distribution designed with cloud pentesting and IoT security in mind.

It includes a full portable laboratory for security and digital forensics experts, but it also includes all you need to develop your own software or protect your privacy with anonymity and crypto tools.

Security

Parrot Security includes a full arsenal of security-oriented tools to perform penetration tests, security audits and more. With a Parrot USB drive in your pocket, you will always be sure to have all you need with you.

Privacy

Parrot includes by default TOR, I2P, anonsurf, gpg, tccf, zulucrypt, veracrypt, truecrypt, luks and many other technologies designed to defend your privacy and your identity.

Development

If you need a comfortable environment with updated frameworks and useful libraries already installed, Parrot will amaze you as it includes a full development-oriented environment with some powerful editors and IDEs pre-installed and many other tools installable from our repository.

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PureOS 8.0 Beta 1 20180904

PureOS is based on Debian’s Testing repository. It is a desktop distribution that can be used as live media (CD or USB) or as full-featured operating systems installed on a hard disk. PureOS uses free and open source software exclusively and is endorsed by the Free Software Foundation.

A user friendly, secure and freedom respecting OS for your daily usage. With PureOS, you are the only one in control of your digital life.

Free/libre software

PureOS is a derivative of Debian GNU/Linux, with the best privacy-protecting software applications preinstalled.

Cutting-edge technology

With GNOME 3 and Wayland, enjoy fluid high-framerate videos, frame-perfect animations and better power management.

Security and Privacy

PureOS helps you surf the web safely, without being tracked by advertisers or marketers.

Privacy, security, and freedom by design

PureOS comes with the best free/libre privacy and security software and apps for privacy “out of the box” — including the Duck Duck Go search engine and HTTPS: Everywhere bundled into our official web browser, Ppure browser

PureOS allows you to easily encrypt your whole operating system and data, with your own encryption keys, whether you download and install it yourself or receive it preloaded.

Freedom

PureOS is entirely free/libre software, meaning that you can freely use it for any purpose, study its source code, share it and even modify it.

You don’t have to trust our word that it respects and protects you — it is independently verifiable by security experts and software developers around the world. Should you find ways to improve its security further, please get in touch with us!

Modern, full-featured and uuser-friendlyWith so many completely free software applications available, we know there is something for everyone, including popular software applications from categories like education, games, graphics, internet, office, programming, science, sound, and video.

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